Renews How to solve 07 Honda Civic battery drain with HDS HIM Scanner?

Here I’d like to share my experience use HDS HIM solve my Hona Civic 07 year Battery Drain.

Car model and year:

2007 Civic automatic.

Tool to use:

HDS HIM For Honda scanner

Car issue description:

Car is completely stock, stock radio, stock alarm system, no amps, no aftermarket speakers, no aftermarket lighting, completely stock. I had a new oem battery put in at the stealership about a year ago. The problem that I am having started about 5 days ago. I park the car at night and in the morning the battery is completely dead, won’t even light up the dash, doors won’t unlock with remote, nothing. It starts right up when I jump it and has no problem starting for the rest of the day. Park the car go to work, come out for lunch, starts right up. Come home park it overnight go to start it in the morning and completely dead.

What I tried to do?

I took it to two Advanced Auto Part stores and the battery and alternator test in normal ranges. The only issue that it came up with was a 6.7 Amp current draw, but this was tested while the car was running with the door open, so the light was on. I got home and did some testing with a DVOM meter put in series with the red lead connected to the positive on thebattery and the black lead connected to the red power lead on the car. With everything off and the meter dial on the 10, I was getting a reading of .01 flashing to .02 and back to .01, so I think it’s flashing from .01 to .02 because of the blinking alarm light. I pulled all the relays in the exterior fuse panel and this had no effect. I then started pulling all the fuses. When I got to fuse #23 in the exterior fuse box the meter went to .000. This fuse is labled as “backup”. With the fuse pulled the radio does not work, but it appears that everything else is working. I am going to leave the fuse out and see what happens in the morning.

Solution to the issue:

Question 1: I park the car at night and in the morning the battery is completely dead, won’t even light up the dash, doors won’t unlock with remote, nothing.

Answer: A flatliner. Better than a hot cuppa to wake your azz up in the morning.

A drain of even 3 amps can kill it overnight.
Perform a draw test after charging the battery back up.

Question 2: The only issue that it came up with was a 6.7 Amp current draw, but this was tested while the car was running with the door open, so the light was on.

Answer: That’s not an issue. That isn’t even any sort of valid test for the problem you have.
You used the word “draw” here. I’m thinking it doesn’t mean what you think it means.

-1.

Question 3: With everything off and the meter dial on the 10,
Answer: 10 what? Amps?

Question 4: I was getting a reading of .01 flashing to .02 and back to .01, so I think

Answer: I think your meter isn’t able to reach the 1 milliamp range (0.001A) that is really needed to do accurate testing of the condition here, if that is what you are trying to do.

If what you have up there is accurate (my interpretation), then that is only 10-20mA, which is acceptable. You didn’t catch the problem in the act (failed mode).

Question 5: When I got to fuse #23 in the exterior fuse box the meter went to .000. This fuse is labled as “backup”. With the fuse pulled the radio does not work, but it appears that everything else is working.

Answer: (Keep in mind: If the ranges on your meter don’t go low enough, then it may display all zeros while there is still a significant problem.)

Ok.

That’s right. It should have gone to almost zero.
That is one of two fuses that we have to install during the PDI, the cars are shipped without those fuses so the batteries don’t run down when the cars sit at the plant parking lots for months at a time.

See if the battery goes dead again without those fuses.

Another poster that was here yesterday has one of the front map lights coming on by itself after sitting for several hours. Just a thought.

Depending on what your result is up there, you could unhook one cable from the battery to see if it is killing itself overnight. Yes, I have seen it happen.

Question 6: Anyone else encounter this type of problem?

Answer: Yes.
I couldn’t begin to tell you what your car is doing though.

My methods are somewhat different.
I use an inductive ammeter, I don’t need to interrupt the battery power to do my initial testing.
The cars are loaded with computers, and if power gets interrupted they can stay “awake” or could allow a computer controlled problem to be reset (disappear because the battery got disconnected).

The computers stay “awake” for a period of time after the key is removed and you exit the car. You cannot obtain accurate test results during this time.
Some cars may be 5-10 minutes, some can be up to 30 minutes and longer.

——————————————————-

Ok, so I turn the car off, open the hood, and trip the hood latch to the closed position with a screwdriver, so the body computers think it is closed as normal.

Open the trunk, flip down the back seat, and close the trunk lid.

Lock the doors with the fob (if applicable) and put the key on the roof or toolbox.

I clamp the meter on the neg battery cable and walk away.

Drink coffee.
Crave a cigarette.
Eat lunch or something to kill time….
Come back in 20-30 minutes and read the meter.

If the meter reads below 30 milliamps, I am done.

If it is over 50mA, then I have some tracking to do.
Need to know exactly what the excess is, sometimes I can tell what is still on by that number.

Examples:

First and most common problem is the AC compressor clutch. Is it still engaged with the engine off? Stuck relay is a well known problem. 0.5-2A. This is known to be an intermittent problem too. You have to catch it in the act to fail the test.
HINT: If the clutch relay brand is anything but MITSUBA, it is suspect.

If no interior lights are on (should be easy to see all of them, and make sure the trunk light is off….that’s why I flipped the seat down.) Sunvisor lights?

200-250mA? The CAN system may still be awake. Some switch input may be stuck on, keeping some of the control units on the network from going to “sleep” mode.
HDS HIM scanner is the next tool in my diagnostic arsenal. I can check a hundred items from the body systems in only a few minutes.
Then a wiring diagram and pointed testing with meters and test lights. Or whatever tool is needed.

I can use my clamp-on ammeter to check individual wires in a harness.

I can use my DVOM to inspect voltage drop across a fuse, to see if there is current flowing through it. Without removing the fuse.

If I pull fuses, I start with the major fuses, not the small ones.
I study what all there is in the car on wiring diagrams.
Study the systems at hand and formulate a plan.
I split the system into sections logically, then follow the path with the draw.
Divide and conquer.
It’s a methodical process to narrow down the many choices.
It is very rare that I do things randomly.
I try hard to make sure there is a definite purpose for every move I make.

I have a slew of other tools for stuff like this too.
From a simple Cub Scout Compass, to a high tech RF signal generator and receiver for tracing wires.

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